I have always been curious about how far I have flown and how many hours I have spent in the air so keeping a log makes perfect sense. There are web sites that let you record and log your flights and these are an ideal replacement for paper log books and spreadsheets as they do all of the manual calculating for you. They also come with maps and everyone loves a good map! Let’s have a look a couple of the sites.

FlightMemory

FlightMemory

FlightMemory is completely free to use and you can pay a fee if you require more detailed reports. Flights are logged by entering the departure and arrival airport codes which are mandatory. Next you enter the departure and arrival dates and times which are optional. The optional aspect is handy if you’re entering flights from the dim and distant past where you no longer have the exact details to hand.

An example of the maps that FlightMemory produces

An example of the maps that FlightMemory produces

The site has the ability to take other details such as aircraft type, airline, aircraft registration and name, your seat, class of travel and free text notes. The data entry boxes are laid out in a logical order and to save time there are drop down lists available. There are also intuitive features such as the site recognising that a flight number of QR81 is for Qatar Airways, saving you having to enter the airline separately. These little touches make entering flights quite straightforward.

The site can import your flights if you have your data in a spreadsheet format however they do charge for this service. There is no ability to export flights which is a concern if the site gets taken down. Here’s a link to my page on Flight Memory which covers all the flights I have ever been on. It gives you an idea of what to expect once you have the data in your log.

Flightdiary

fd-logo

Flightdiary is another popular site to log flights. The site is has a much sexier design compared to FlightMemory and the map is far nicer as it uses Google Maps. Pie charts and bar charts are used liberally to assist in the presentation of your flight log. You can automatically import flights via CSV files and also you can export your entered data in the same format.

An example of the pie charts that Flightdiary produces

An example of the pie charts that Flightdiary produces

Sexier does not automatically mean better. Entering flights manually runs over a few screens making it cumbersome and time consuming. The date format is locked to US format causing pain for people from other countries and increasing log time.¬†FlightMemory allows you to choose which you prefer in your settings which is more user friendly. Here’s a link to my page on Flightdiary to give you a flavour for it. I tried it out for this review so it only has a couple of flights entered into it.

Overall Thoughts

FlightMemory is the site I prefer to use to log my flights. Prior to knowing about FlightMemory I never kept a log. I had to piece together my history from boarding passes, old flight reviews and from memory. It makes sense to keep a log if you fly a lot as you will never remember all your flights otherwise. I enjoy seeing how many hours I have spent in the air and so on. That’s the aviation geek in me!